Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.ufrn.br/jspui/handle/123456789/25139
Title: NMDA receptor signaling is important for neural tube formation and for preventing antiepileptic drug-induced neural tube defects
Authors: Sequerra, Eduardo B.
Goyal, Raman
Castro, Patricio A.
Levin, Jacqueline B.
Borodinsky, Laura N.
Keywords: Neural Tube Defect;N-methyl-D-aspartate;Desenvolvimento;Plasticidade neural
Issue Date: 30-Apr-2018
Citation: SEQUERRA, E. B. et al. NMDA receptor signaling is important for neural tube formation and for preventing antiepileptic drug-induced neural tube defects. J Neurosci., pii: 2634-17, abr./2018. DOI: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.2634-17.2018
Portuguese Abstract: Failure of neural tube closure leads to neural tube defects (NTDs), which can have serious neurological consequences or be lethal. Use of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) during pregnancy increases the incidence of NTDs in offspring by unknown mechanisms. Here we show that during Xenopus laevis neural tube formation, neural plate cells exhibit spontaneous calcium dynamics that are partially mediated by glutamate signaling. We demonstrate that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are important for the formation of the neural tube and loss of their function induces an increase in neural plate cell proliferation and impairs neural cell migration, which result in NTDs. We present evidence that the AED valproic acid perturbs glutamate signaling, leading to NTDs that are rescued with varied efficacy by preventing DNA synthesis, activating NMDA receptors, or recruiting the NMDA receptor target ERK1/2. These findings may prompt mechanistic identification of AEDs that do not interfere with neural tube formation.
URI: https://repositorio.ufrn.br/jspui/handle/123456789/25139
Embargoed until: 2018-10-30
Appears in Collections:ICe - Artigos publicados em periódicos

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