Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://repositorio.ufrn.br/jspui/handle/123456789/26056
Title: Primates: Do newborn vocalizations affect the behavioral and hormonal responses of nonreproductive male common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)
Authors: Mota, Maria Teresa da Silva
Barbosa, Maricele Nascimento
Keywords: Alloparental cares;Infant vocalizations;Cortisol;Previous experience;Marmosets;Callithrix jacchus
Issue Date: Jan-2014
Citation: BARBOSA, Maricele Nascimento ; MOTA, Maria Teresa da Silva. Do newborn vocalizations affect the behavioral and hormonal responses of nonreproductive male common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus)?. Primates, v. 55, p. 293-302, jan. 2014. ISSN 0032-8332. Disponível em: <https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10329-013-0404-0#Abs1>. Acesso em: 19 jun. 2018.
Portuguese Abstract: Parental care in mammals is influenced by sensory stimuli from infants, such as sight and sound, and by changes in the hormone levels of caretakers. To determine the responsiveness of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) adult males with and without previous experience in caretaking to newborn sensory cues, we exposed twelve males to infant vocalization recordings and assessed their hormonal and behavioral responses. Males were placed in the testing cage for 10 min under two conditions: (a) control condition (exposure to adult conspecific vocalization recordings), and (b) experimental condition (exposure to infant vocalization recordings). We recorded the frequency of approach towards the sound source, the time spent near it and locomotion frequency of males in the cage under both conditions. Blood samples were collected after each test for cortisol, measured by the enzyme immunoassay method. Infant vocalization affects the behavioral and hormonal responses of non-reproductive male common marmosets. All males approached and spent more time near the sound source and showed an increase in locomotion during infant vocalization exposure compared to the control condition. Successive exposure to infant vocalization increased the responsiveness in inexperienced males. Cortisol levels were significantly higher following infant vocalization exposure compared to the control condition. These findings support the assumption that sound stimuli from the newborn are critical in initiating and maintaining caretaker responsiveness and that cortisol seems to be important for alertness to sensory stimuli, modulating their motivation to interact with infants.
URI: https://repositorio.ufrn.br/jspui/handle/123456789/26056
ISSN: 0032-8332
Appears in Collections:CB - DFIS - Artigos publicados em periódicos

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